360 Degrees Of Brilliance!

The new Moto 360 2 has been launched in 46 mm (same as its predecessor) and 42 mm variants, with both men’s and women’s collection of the smaller model on offer. It has a display resolution of 360 x 330 spread out over 1.56-inches on the larger model, and 360 x 325 over 1.37-inches on the smaller one. Both the sizes look great with bright visuals. The screen too comes with Gorilla glass 3.

The straps are swappable via a quick release catch, and there’s a wider array of customization obtainable through the Moto Maker service. The straps are available in both stainless steel and leather.

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The 2nd-generation Moto 360 is motorized by a quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 400 processor, supported by an Adreno 305 GPU, 512MB of RAM and a 4GB of storage on board. Talking about connectivity, sadly, it’s Wi-Fi, GPS and Bluetooth is only part of the Sport range. The new Moto 360 will work fine with both Android and iPhones.

It has a Live Dial feature for Android Wear, exclusive to the new Moto 360, allowing users to separately set dials on the home screen. Activity metrics can be recorded and measured using the pre-installed Moto Body software which keeps track of calorie burn, steps and so on. The addition of an optical heart rate monitor permits users to track their beat per minute (BPM) stats.

The battery in the bigger Moto 360 is 400mAh while it is 300mAh in the smaller one. That mostly translates into a full day of use with the ambient sensor turned on. Like the original 360, the new models come with a charging dock station in the box.

Motorola hopes that Moto 360 2 will go above and beyond of what was offered with the original smartwatch, particularly in terms of customization. The second generation of Motorola’s smartwatch is better designed, smarter and comes with more customizable options. It isn’t perfect, but definitely better than the first one. The second generation Moto 360 is now available in the US, for anything between US$300 – 430, depending on how you want it, using the Moto Maker service.

Picture courtesy- roonby.com


by techtalks @TechTalks October 26, 2015 5:09 AM UTC

DIGITAL DEBATE

Mobile Upgrades: Killing The Product Before Its Time?

Have to agree. The speed of newer phone models within the same series and newer app versions lead to more thought put into buying decisions. Phone lines have a definite short shelf life

Lionel Gurjao

Frequently upgrading the software is a real problem as updating the software might cause your phone to lag because of the older hardware.

Shivendra Singh

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

Q5 blackberry

Alhassan A Bukar

Nice

Ishwar Maradi