Google Blocks Adobe Flash Content

Flash was probably the most fundamental and essential feature of the internet ever since its release in 1996. Twenty years later, the Adobe internet plug-in, which was the cause of numerous security weaknesses, is finally being phased out as a new markup language, HTML 5 takes its place.

1

Earlier this month, search giant Google blocked all Flash content with the release of the latest Chrome 53. The browser now runs on HTML5, which is an improved way to include interactive content on the internet.

Chrome 53 will stop all small and invisible Flash content on the web that tends to slow down the loading of a webpage. This follows Google’s last attempt where it made almost all automatic Flash content optional.

While you will still be able to allow Flash content to run on a webpage where it is absolutely necessary, the majority of all Flash content including smaller objects, is now blocked. Google claims that its Chrome customers will benefit from this block as when Flash loads on a page, it tends to make the entire process of booting a webpage slow. On a phone or a laptop, Flash can even eat up your battery life besides your internet data.

With the exception of a number of websites including Facebook, Yahoo and a few others which will prompt you to initiate Flash as they still greatly depend on it, Google has blocked or else begun to phase out all Flash content.

For Flash the end has never been clearer as Google is not the only one that has declared its stand against it. While Apple blocked all Flash content a while ago, Firefox also recently announced that it was making the same move as Google Chrome. Microsoft too has blocked Adobe’s freeware software and included a click-to-play option for some content in the latest anniversary edition of Windows 10. By 2018, one can expect Adobe Flash to be completely phased out.

Picture courtesy – nextgeekers.com


by techtalks @TechTalks October 4, 2016 5:33 AM UTC

DIGITAL DEBATE

Mobile Upgrades: Killing The Product Before Its Time?

Have to agree. The speed of newer phone models within the same series and newer app versions lead to more thought put into buying decisions. Phone lines have a definite short shelf life

Lionel Gurjao

Frequently upgrading the software is a real problem as updating the software might cause your phone to lag because of the older hardware.

Shivendra Singh

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

Q5 blackberry

Alhassan A Bukar

Nice

Ishwar Maradi