Gravity Rush Remastered Review

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Gravity Rush tells the tale of an amnesiac girl called Kat who, aided by her magical cat Dusty, becomes something of a superhero in the floating town of Hekseville. Hekseville has been split apart, its multiple locales strewn across a sea of deadly gravity storms while a mysterious race of creatures known as the Nevi threaten the peace.

Armed with her ability to shift the world’s gravitational pull, Kat must save the city and uncover the truth behind the Nevi. Or something like that. It all begins to stop making sense halfway through.

Something of an open-world superhero game, only with a very specific super power in a rather small world, players are encouraged to explore Hekseville by bending gravity to their will (“shifting,” to use the game’s terminology). With the press of a shoulder button, Kat will start to float, allowing players to freely move the camera and select a destination. Once selected, the destination will serve as a new gravitational point, and the entire world will alter its physics.

Using this power, Kat can “fly” across the city at a rapid pace, although she’s actually falling by tilting the world to suit her needs. Think the anti-grav environments in Visceral’s Dead Space, but spread across a more open and free world. Oh, and don’t try to think about how Kat and the civilians are surviving falls of several hundred feet. It’s not important.

When called upon to fight, Kat can land simple kicks to the Nevi in order to shatter their glowing weak spots. However, she’s far more deadly when using the air to her advantage.

While shifting, players can launch devastating gravity kicks by selecting a weak point and launching an attack from afar. Kat will fall toward the Nevi at a rapid pace, landing a huge kick that deals a lot more damage.

Gravity Rush is more about exploration than combat. Hekseville is littered with purple gems that can be collected and spent on upgrading Kat’s powers, making her more durable, powerful, and better able to exploit her shifting ability.

These gems can be hidden atop tall buildings or underneath the city itself, and uncovering new pockets of gems is a fun experience – even if it can make one a little obsessive. Similar to Crackdown, there’s a lot of entertainment in poking around the world’s crannies in search of upgrade McGuffins.

Navigating Hekseville is a real joy that never gets old. There’s something breathtaking about falling upwards, changing directions, and whizzing past buildings at an angle. When Kat gains the ability to slide along surfaces and pick up objects with a gravitational pull, the potential to feel spectacularly superior is immense.

It’s great fun to just fly around the world, come crashing down to Earth, and terrify the poor locals who never seem to cope with the shock of it all.

Picture courtesy – technobuffalo.com


by techtalks @TechTalks March 10, 2016 4:46 AM UTC

DIGITAL DEBATE

Mobile Upgrades: Killing The Product Before Its Time?

Have to agree. The speed of newer phone models within the same series and newer app versions lead to more thought put into buying decisions. Phone lines have a definite short shelf life

Lionel Gurjao

Frequently upgrading the software is a real problem as updating the software might cause your phone to lag because of the older hardware.

Shivendra Singh

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

Q5 blackberry

Alhassan A Bukar

Nice

Ishwar Maradi