Grow Up: Reviewing The Sequel

The sequel to Ubisoft’s Grow Home game, Grow Up follows the plant-loving protagonist B.U.D. as he navigates his way across a planet. As fun as the game is, it can also be equally frustrating.

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Follow the happy and bumbling robot B.U.D. as he maneuvers his way across a massive, brightly coloured planet that is covered with oddly shaped plants.  Having crash landed on the alien planet, the robot’s ship broke apart and effectively shattered into a million little pieces. The main aim of the game is to collect the parts and ultimately reassemble the spaceship so that B.U.D. and his drone can reach their intended destination.

B.U.D. must make his way across deserts and swamps and find his way up to floating islands, using the plants which grow abundantly, some of which can even grow upwards and transport the robot. At every level, the game is filled with a wide array of plants and seeds that can be collected and stored in his inventory. Most of these plants have their own purpose, such as toadstools that double up as trampolines and tall thin vines that can be used to climb vertically.  The problem that arises however, is that Grow Up does not include any hints or information of any kind as to what each plant is used for. Thus it is left up to the gamer to figure out their purpose along the way.

Another issue that arises is unfortunately an unavoidable one. The controls for B.U.D. are as neurotic as his character is. His awkward gait is slow and jerky, which makes navigating him along vertical path and across obstacles, a difficult task in itself.

While boldly coloured and visually impressive, the fiddly controls make the game one that requires utmost patience and precision. The game is available for the PC, Xbox One and PlayStation 4 platforms.

Picture courtesy – digitalspyuk.cdnds.net

 


by techtalks @TechTalks October 3, 2016 6:25 AM UTC

DIGITAL DEBATE

Mobile Upgrades: Killing The Product Before Its Time?

Have to agree. The speed of newer phone models within the same series and newer app versions lead to more thought put into buying decisions. Phone lines have a definite short shelf life

Lionel Gurjao

Frequently upgrading the software is a real problem as updating the software might cause your phone to lag because of the older hardware.

Shivendra Singh

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

Q5 blackberry

Alhassan A Bukar

Nice

Ishwar Maradi