How To Back Up Data

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Backing up your data might sound like a boring chore only carried out by IT administrators and the super-geeky, but should your smartphone fall down a well or your laptop get swiped on the train, backups are the only chance you have of getting your files back again.

Fortunately making sure backups are in place is a lot easier than it was five or ten years ago – many systems and apps are now designed to minimise the need for manual backups. If you want to know how to get started and keep your data safe, read on.

Choose your files

Your first job is working out exactly what you want to back up, which should be fairly straightforward – all those pictures, movies, spreadsheets, essays and other bits stored on our hard drives. Two copies of your important files is the bare minimum, but you really need three, with one of these in a separate location: what would happen if a flood or a fire swept through your home? If you’re relying on an external hard drive set up next to your laptop then both of these copies would be made unusable at the same time.

Email can be a tricky one which is why it’s a good idea to use a cloud-based service such as Gmail or Outlook even if you run a desktop email client too. If you don’t have your messages backed up on the web then consult the backup and export instructions for your application of choice for help. Pay particular attention to any photos and videos you want kept safe, although remember that the likes of iTunes and Google Play Movies let you re-download any content that you’ve already paid for, so that’s not something you need to worry about.

Choose your apps

Once you know which files to focus on, there are all kinds of options for backing them up, including just plugging in an external hard drive and copying the data over manually. Both Windows and Mac have built-in tools for making regular backups to external hard drives connected to your computer – if you combine these tools with the respective cloud storage services offered by Microsoft and Apple (OneDrive and iCloud) then you have your three copies, although you may need to pay a monthly fee for some extra online space depending on how much data is involved.

Services such as Dropbox, Box, Google Drive and Amazon Cloud Drive run across multiple platforms and sync all of the files in a particular folder to the web and other computers (the three copy rule again) – in each case you will probably need to pay for additional room online, although some special offers are available (Amazon Cloud Drive offers unlimited photo storage with Amazon Prime, for instance). Move all of your crucial files into the designated folder for these apps and new files as well as edits to existing ones are automatically synced to the cloud.

Picture courtesy – evscorporation.com


by techtalks @TechTalks January 25, 2016 5:59 AM UTC

DIGITAL DEBATE

Mobile Upgrades: Killing The Product Before Its Time?

Have to agree. The speed of newer phone models within the same series and newer app versions lead to more thought put into buying decisions. Phone lines have a definite short shelf life

Lionel Gurjao

Frequently upgrading the software is a real problem as updating the software might cause your phone to lag because of the older hardware.

Shivendra Singh

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

Q5 blackberry

Alhassan A Bukar

Nice

Ishwar Maradi