How To Stop Android Apps Running In The Background

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Feel like your smartphone or tablet just isn’t getting the same mileage that it used to? Is your battery conking out by 3pm when it once lasted all the way to bedtime? Is it sluggish and less responsive than in the past? You may have some rogue apps sucking your system’s resources in the background.

The most common symptom of background apps run amok is a hit in battery life. To see which apps are hogging juice, go to Settings > Battery to get an overview of what apps have been draining your battery the most since your last full charge.

If you’re looking for a bit more information than just battery use, you can get a log of how much processing power each app has a tendency to use. But first, you’re going to have to get Developer Access.

Becoming a Developer is kind of a hidden option. You won’t find “Unlock Developer options” anywhere in your Settings menu. What you’ll need to do is go to Settings > About Device and scroll down to Build number. Tap Build number a few times. You won’t get any response, but if you tap enough times, you’ll get a notification congratulating you on your promotion to Developer.

The real villains you’re looking for are usually games or music players that you’re not actively using. You might also have some other app that’s sucking a lot of RAM or battery and you can’t think of a reason why it should. Some apps need to be constantly sending and receiving packets of information to perform their intended function, but if that Spot the Difference game you haven’t played for weeks is showing up on your battery list, it’s time to put that sucker down.

The quickest way to stop a runaway app in its tracks is just to kill it. If you’re running Lollipop or greater, then the fastest way to kill an app is to tap the Recent Apps button (that little square on the bottom right) and find the app in the stack of ‘cards.’ Swiping the card left or right will kill it dead.

Alternatively, you can always Force Stop an app. Go to Settings > Apps and then tap the app you want to murder. Once in the menu, tap Force Stop to continue the execution. You may get a warning that doing this may make the app misbehave, but if it’s sucking resources in the background, it’s already misbehaving.

If an app has proven itself to be wholly untrustworthy, the best step is to just delete it from your device. Go to Settings > Apps and tap the one you want to get rid of. Say goodbye and then tap uninstall.

If you really want to take full control of your device, however, the best solution is to root it. Root users will be able to unlock Greenify’s full automation capabilities and get rid of bloatware for good.

Picture courtesy – bgr.com


by techtalks @TechTalks January 27, 2016 4:52 AM UTC

DIGITAL DEBATE

Mobile Upgrades: Killing The Product Before Its Time?

Have to agree. The speed of newer phone models within the same series and newer app versions lead to more thought put into buying decisions. Phone lines have a definite short shelf life

Lionel Gurjao

Frequently upgrading the software is a real problem as updating the software might cause your phone to lag because of the older hardware.

Shivendra Singh

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

Q5 blackberry

Alhassan A Bukar

Nice

Ishwar Maradi