Intel Compute Stick Review : Niche Product But Under-Equipped

Intel’s new Compute Stick is a computer on a stick! Using one of its Atom processors, Intel succeeded to stuff everything a fully functional PC needs in something the size of a chewing gum packet. All you require to get it going is to plug it into a display that has an HDMI port, connect it to power and attach your accessories. It announces a new age of computing, one where you can turn any display into a standby-desktop in a few minutes.  Let’s check out more about the Compute Stick.

Hardware

Intel clearly did not invest time on the Compute Stick’s design. It’s a plastic, rectangular black stick that’s simply uninteresting. Aside from a plain, white Intel logo, the only bit of style it has are vents. Further than that, you have got one full-sized USB port for your accessories; a micro-USB port that connects to the AC adapter; a micro SD card slot and a power button with a lone blue power LED. While it’s small, it’s not slim, it’s about the size of four typical USB sticks put together. The Compute Stick is decently useful, although its lack of being non-flashy, it probably will not matter much since it’s mainly going to be stuck behind a TV or monitor.

Setup and performance

If you pay close attention, you will notice that there’s one major flaw with the Compute Stick’s design: It only has one USB port! Intel assumes you will use our own USB hub to get a keyboard, mouse and other accessories connected. But if you don’t have one handy, it can really mess up the entire setup process.

The Compute Stick handles the basic workflow like browsing the web, chatting with coworkers and friends or clients and editing images occasionally but it was too slow for comfort. It is not meant for heavy usage, or for playing games. It might be useful if you are simply looking for a slim media computer for your modest house.

Another potential problem is the Compute Stick’s lack of speakers or headphone jack. If you plan on watching TV shows or listening to music through it, but don’t have a TV to hand, make sure your monitor has integral speakers or a headphone jack.

The Windows version of the Compute Stick version has 32GB of inbuilt storage, while the Ubuntu version jams in just 8GB. Luckily, both can be increased with a little extra space for your files, via the microSD card slot.

Summary

The Intel Compute Stick is stimulating, but it’s more of an idea than a complete product. It lacks an attention-grabbing design, also in every other feature, the Compute Stick is somewhat imperfect. Performance is restricted, while the setup process and general use is poorly affected by the lack of a secondary USB slot. You also have to confirm the screen you plug it into has its own speakers.


by techtalks @TechTalks August 10, 2015 5:40 AM UTC

DIGITAL DEBATE

Mobile Upgrades: Killing The Product Before Its Time?

Have to agree. The speed of newer phone models within the same series and newer app versions lead to more thought put into buying decisions. Phone lines have a definite short shelf life

Lionel Gurjao

Frequently upgrading the software is a real problem as updating the software might cause your phone to lag because of the older hardware.

Shivendra Singh

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

Q5 blackberry

Alhassan A Bukar

Nice

Ishwar Maradi