Intel’s Joule Creates Computer Vision

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Technology manufacturing giant, Intel recently released its latest system-on-module processing device. The chipset called the Joule compute module has the ability to integrate computer vision into a device. Computer Vision which is the future of Internet of Things and all devices that are connected to it, gives machines the ability to see and then process that information intelligently.

At the recent Intel Developer Conference (IDF) that took place in San Francisco, the CEO of Intel, Brian Krzanich announced the launch of the chip. The chip includes a depth sensing camera called Intel RealSense. The device also features a WiFi support of 802.11ac and can capture video quality of 4K.

Intel also said that the small size and the low-power capacity of the chip, makes it perfect for a wide number of applications that need premium edge computing. Some of these applications are robotics, computer vision, drones, AR (augmented reality), VR (virtual reality), micro-servers, industrial IoT (Internet of Things) and others.

In short, the Joule chip will give devices ‘eyes’. Through these a device can then intelligently collect information and analyse the data. This will change the prototyping process and make it more automatic besides being faster and less expensive.

The Intel Developer Conference also had numerous partners of Intel presenting the wide array of uses and applications of computer vision technology. One of the first uses of the computer vision is its application the Pivothead which is a pair of sunglasses that can capture full-HD video or images and stream it live.

The Intel Joule chip is now available for sale in two different modules, the 570x and the 550x.

Picture courtesy – intel.com


by techtalks @TechTalks October 4, 2016 5:40 AM UTC

DIGITAL DEBATE

Mobile Upgrades: Killing The Product Before Its Time?

Have to agree. The speed of newer phone models within the same series and newer app versions lead to more thought put into buying decisions. Phone lines have a definite short shelf life

Lionel Gurjao

Frequently upgrading the software is a real problem as updating the software might cause your phone to lag because of the older hardware.

Shivendra Singh

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

Q5 blackberry

Alhassan A Bukar

Nice

Ishwar Maradi