Microsoft Xbox One S: Review

The revamped Xbox One from Microsoft occupies an interesting space among the current generation of gaming enthusiasts. Not because it’s sleeker than its original avatar, slim gaming consoles are not new, after all. Earlier, Sega had tweaked both its Mega Drive and Master System, while Sony introduced at least one revamped version for each of its PlayStation. In fact, Microsoft itself had launched a svelte Xbox 360.

It’s the hardware improvement and the marginal boost in power that lends the Xbox One S an edge over its predecessor. The new console now supports ultra HD 4K videos and HDR colour, and upscales 1080p games. It also has GPU and CPU upgrades to potentially improve the frame rates of more demanding games.

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But the Xbox One S seems to be a stopgap arrangement because it comes scarcely before “Project Scorpio”, slated to arrive by late 2017. The One S boasts of virtual reality support and 4K gaming, with the new Xbox still not matching up to it.

But the stopgap seems rather good. The Xbox One S is 40% smaller, notwithstanding the integration of the hefty power supply into the console. Everything on the One S is streamlined and neat. It just requires a power supply cord and a HDMI cable.

The Microsoft Xbox One S, with its stark aesthetics and perfect angles, is far more impressive in looks in a home entertainment setup, sans the imposing loom of its older version.  It still enables HDMI input if you want to use the console as a TV hub. It drops the Kinect built-in support. You can of course buy an adapter. But the missing port suggests end days for the motion sensor peripheral.

Minor changes to the console of the One S improve design aesthetics. The eject and power buttons are now physical and not capacitive. The controller sync button and USB ports are sensibly place on the machine’s front. Microsoft has oriented the One S vertically, seemingly yielding to consumer demand. And it looks far better this way.

The video output for use with 4K TVs is superb. The ultra-HD Blu-ray playback is fantastic and so is streaming UHD videos from Netflix. The device is one of the best 4K video players around.

Upscaling of games like Halo 5 and Forza Motorsport looks amazing. The latter sometimes seems photo-real. The older Xbox 360 with backward compatibility doesn’t quite deliver the same feel. Besides, regular DVDs suffer from SD quality video output.

The One S controller has a micro-grip texture on its underside. It lends more comfort during those long gaming sessions. The joypad can be easily synced with Windows 10 computers; a push for Microsoft’s cross-compatible games.

The Microsoft Xbox One S probably may not be worth upgrading if you own the Xbox One, unless you have a fetish for 4K videos or want to physically downsize the original model. But for newcomers, the One S is Microsoft’s best hardware iteration and a beautiful gaming and video kit.

Picture courtesy – trustedreviews.com


by techtalks @TechTalks August 25, 2016 10:06 AM UTC

DIGITAL DEBATE

Mobile Upgrades: Killing The Product Before Its Time?

Have to agree. The speed of newer phone models within the same series and newer app versions lead to more thought put into buying decisions. Phone lines have a definite short shelf life

Lionel Gurjao

Frequently upgrading the software is a real problem as updating the software might cause your phone to lag because of the older hardware.

Shivendra Singh

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

Q5 blackberry

Alhassan A Bukar

Nice

Ishwar Maradi