Navigating A Car – A Thing Of The Past In The Near Future!

The Google Self-Driving Car (SDC) is a project by Google X that includes creating technology for self-directed cars, mainly electric cars and, the software powering Google’s cars is called Google Chauffeur.

In 2012, the test group of vehicles included three Lexus RX450h, an Audi TT and six Toyota Prius, each escorted by one of a dozen drivers with flawless driving records and a Google engineer. By May 2015, that convoy comprised 23 Lexus SUVs.

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Google has been awarded a patent for a driverless car ‘landing strip’ which carries signs to help the car park and a code that would register it on to the internet to download useful information.

The patent application is called ‘transitioning a mixed-mode vehicle to autonomous mode’, which lets the car switch from human-driving mode to a driverless mode.

The landing strip features a QR code that would allow the car to log on to the internet to access an affluence of data like other available spaces, its accurate location and which direction it should be headed to.

The patent clarifies that GPS receivers are at times not accurate; however, if the vehicle can check its path and knows where it has started from, it can easily be told to drive from that point, adjusting its direction at the appropriate places.

The patent also explains how data offered at the landing strip could also ask the vehicle to look up for the address on the internet which would let it know if it needs to drive itself to a repair shop, or merely move to another parking bay to make sure a hire company had its cars spread uniformly across its range of pick-up spots. It says that the landing strip could also provide information about how long the vehicle should pause before driving off.

Even though the technology may sound enormous, Google has been testing a task force of driver-less cars for several years now with the help of artificial intelligence and Google Street View maps as well as video cameras and a range of sensors.

Picture courtesy- hitc-s.com


by techtalks @TechTalks October 26, 2015 4:56 AM UTC

DIGITAL DEBATE

Mobile Upgrades: Killing The Product Before Its Time?

Have to agree. The speed of newer phone models within the same series and newer app versions lead to more thought put into buying decisions. Phone lines have a definite short shelf life

Lionel Gurjao

Frequently upgrading the software is a real problem as updating the software might cause your phone to lag because of the older hardware.

Shivendra Singh

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

Q5 blackberry

Alhassan A Bukar

Nice

Ishwar Maradi