Nexdock Turns Intel’s Compute Card Into 2-In-1 Laptop

In the recent years, there has been an eruption of configurations in computers and laptops.

At CES 2017 Intel announced the Compute Card which is essentially a full computer but in a debit card-sized device, integrated with CPU, GPU and wireless connectivity. The design of this compute card is such that it lets hardware manufacturers add devices installed within the computer to smart devices without any hassle, all built around a single, up-gradable standard.

laptop

The Compute Card has been designed in a way that it goes in the slot provided for the card inside other devices, just like a debit card. The measurements of the card are 95-by-55-by-5mm and inside there is a 7th Gen Intel Core vPro processor along with all the other components required to run this tiny PC. Considering the features of this compute card, with the basic factors and electricity one is good to use this as a laptop.

Last year NexDock offered us a 14-inch screen, keyboard, and battery in the form of a laptop. It was priced at $119 the reason behind this price was that you had to use a smartphone, Raspberry Pi, or Compute Stick to add the computing element separately, to create a fully-functional laptop. And now with support for the Intel Compute Card we’re getting the new NexDock.

The original NexDock had one issue which was that any device didn’t fit inside the covering that was added to act as the mastermind of the machine. Even a Raspberry Pi had to sit on the back of the display. However, this has been changed with the introduction of the Compute Card.

The new Nexdock is considered to be one of the first products that is making optimum utilization of the Intel Compute Card. The company has been listed as one of Intel’s regional partners for the Compute Card. With a unified slot where the Compute Card will rest, the new NexDock has been introduced. You have an efficiently working laptop as soon as the compute card is channelled inside the slot and you need not connect any wires or devices externally.

If Intel comes up with an upgraded compute card, you simply remove the old one and insert a new one. The new NexDock will provide the computing power support for connecting other devices including a Raspberry Pi and smartphones. Once the keyboard is detached, one can use the touchscreen for input and the new NexDock will also function as a tablet.

The aim is to launch NexDock in mid-2017 synchronously with the Intel Compute Card. With the original NexDock being priced at $119, let’s hope they manage to maintain a similar price-point.

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Picture courtesy – nexdock.com


by techtalks @TechTalks April 17, 2017 11:28 AM UTC

DIGITAL DEBATE

Mobile Upgrades: Killing The Product Before Its Time?

Leave a Reply to Ishwar Maradi Cancel reply

Have to agree. The speed of newer phone models within the same series and newer app versions lead to more thought put into buying decisions. Phone lines have a definite short shelf life

Lionel Gurjao

Frequently upgrading the software is a real problem as updating the software might cause your phone to lag because of the older hardware.

Shivendra Singh

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

Q5 blackberry

Alhassan A Bukar

Nice

Ishwar Maradi