Reliving Your Own Kitchen Nightmare With Gordon Ramsay

Ever found Gordon Ramsay garish? Well, you haven’t seen anything yet of this restaurateur and TV personality. The motormouth of cordon bleu is now the key character of a smartphone game. The app has been developed by same team which had made the Kim Kardashian official iPhone game, and similar other stuff.  The premise: you are in your kitchen and have to prepare food. Ramsay is loitering nearby, offering advice; and occasionally abuse.

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So what can we make from all of this? What are the lessons to be learnt from the experience of working closely with the celebrity chef? Also, was he pleased about being right up there with the “Matalan App” for popularity within some days of the game’s release?

Ramsay is a superhuman

Swipe your smartphone screen as fast as you can. Get the orders flying out to your customers and soon Ramsay will burst out into flames. Click on his image and hear him say, “I’m super Gordon,” before he whizzes across your restaurant as a ball of fire, and promptly serves every single order, seemingly out of nowhere. But that surely is no indication of Ramsay having some kind of a messiah complex.

Ramsay is super kind and encouraging

In a far departure from his TV avatar, where he greets participants with choicest expletives, Ramsay appears as calm and encouraging in the app. You will be left pleasantly surprised with his controlled reaction, whereas in every single TV show, Ramsay takes an almost devilish pleasure to rile people by saying that their overdone burgers taste more like a minced arse sandwich. Here in the app he only gets a tad disappointed when you burn the bread. But if you finish a level successfully, all that you get to hear is, “Trust me, you have got talent.” And Ramsay says that all the while brandishing a knife menacingly.

Ramsay’s cooking standard is lower than you think

At one point in the game, you find yourself taking out the turkey from the oven that looks more like latex gloves in the midst of some dry slices of bread. You hear him mutter “stunning” thrice. A few more levels and he will asks you to check out a new item. It’s one of his favourite, if cooked right, Ramsay says. He then goes on to show you the making of  hash brown upon what appears as a mini version of the Thames in ketchup. It seems Michelin-starred cooking is on a downhill curve.

Ramsay is fun to disappoint

You will want to win the game, if you have ever been a fan of Ramsay and loved him reducing budding restaurateurs to tears. It’s a very addictive game. But there’s an unmistakable charm to fail the task deliberately and as badly as possible, so that he screams you to shut the game. It really happens, particularly because the man’s praise sounds impossibly hollow and mumbled. It’s as if someone has been shot with a tranquiliser gun but still managing to speak.

Picture courtesy – popsugar.com


by techtalks @TechTalks August 31, 2016 6:10 AM UTC

DIGITAL DEBATE

Mobile Upgrades: Killing The Product Before Its Time?

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They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

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They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

Q5 blackberry

Alhassan A Bukar

Nice

Ishwar Maradi