Samsung And The Exploding Batteries

galaxy-note-7-s-pen_04

When Samsung first released its Galaxy Note 7, the public received the smartphone with cheers and much appreciation. However just a few days later, reports of the phones lithium-ion batteries catching fire sparked up all over. Then there were complaints of the devices exploding in the pockets of people or while it was plugged in and charging. This turned the entire device on its head and the company and the batteries came under the magnifier.

With 92 separate reports of exploding phone batteries, Samsung was forced to order a nationwide recall of its Galaxy Note 7 and the company’s issues several warnings to customers. People were also asked not to turn on or charge their Galaxy Note 7 phones on airplanes.

Consumers reported burns and cases of their garages and cars being damaged by a fire started by the phone. However these batteries are not only found in smartphones, they can also be found in electric vehicles and laptops too.

The lithium-ion battery is a pouch-style device packs a large amount of power in a tiny body.  When the heat that emitted from the battery spread to the other cells in the phone, massive overheating was caused.

A few years ago, two electric vehicles by Tesla Model S caught fire when the diver hit some debris on the road. A similar such incident also occurred on-board two Boeing 787 passenger planes in the year 2013. Then in the beginning of this year, tech companies Sony, Toshiba and Panasonic had to recall a number of their laptops as they were major fire hazards. However the most prominent recall of a device due to the battery, was from Dell in the year 2006, when 4.1 million laptops were ordered back for battery issues.

Samsung offered their customers two options, either to exchange the damaged Galaxy Note 7 for a new device or instead get a full refund.

Samsung was doing very well early in the year with products like the Galaxy Note 5 being declared as the top-rated smartphone. However following these incidents, the company’s stock has dropped by an alarming 7 percent.

Picture courtesy – Ubergizmo

 


by techtalks @TechTalks October 18, 2016 4:55 AM UTC

DIGITAL DEBATE

Mobile Upgrades: Killing The Product Before Its Time?

Have to agree. The speed of newer phone models within the same series and newer app versions lead to more thought put into buying decisions. Phone lines have a definite short shelf life

Lionel Gurjao

Frequently upgrading the software is a real problem as updating the software might cause your phone to lag because of the older hardware.

Shivendra Singh

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

Q5 blackberry

Alhassan A Bukar

Nice

Ishwar Maradi