Twitter Debuts QR Codes

Twitter-compressed

Twitter 1-compressed

QR codes were hugely popular when they first released a few years ago. The scan-able bar codes made connecting with companies and other users very easy. While the hype has certainly died down in recent times, apps like Snapchat have maximised on the feature in order to gain more users. The latest company to add QR codes to their repertoire, is Twitter.

Up until last week, users would have to search for a Twitter handle or profile and then click on ‘Follow’, to keep track of that user. The social media site has now thankfully made the process a lot simpler by introducing QR codes. Though it is doubtful that this introduction will actually result in a substantial number of new followers, it is certainly a positive addition.

Similar to the Snapchat feature, each Twitter user will have their own QR code, with their profile picture placed in the centre. This will make it a lot easier for users to gain more followers and market their Twitter handle. A user can locate their QR code from under the ‘Gear’ icon on their profile. Then by tapping on the right arrow, you will see options such as ‘Save Photo’ or ‘Tweet Photo’. This QR code can then be used as your profile photo, shared using email or other apps, or even be placed on business cards and on the door of your business.

Scanning someone else’s code is easy enough. All you have to do is click on the button which says ‘QR Scanner’ and then take a photo of their code. This will then ask you to confirm whether or not you would actually like to follow the user.

While at one point, Twitter had a growth rate that was on par with that of apps like Snapchat and Instagram, in recent times in has become staggeringly slow. Available on both Android and iOS, Twitter hopes that this addition will help their struggling service grow exponentially.

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Picture courtesy – macrumors.com, gadgets360cdn.com


by techtalks @TechTalks December 2, 2016 9:38 AM UTC

DIGITAL DEBATE

Mobile Upgrades: Killing The Product Before Its Time?

Have to agree. The speed of newer phone models within the same series and newer app versions lead to more thought put into buying decisions. Phone lines have a definite short shelf life

Lionel Gurjao

Frequently upgrading the software is a real problem as updating the software might cause your phone to lag because of the older hardware.

Shivendra Singh

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

Q5 blackberry

Alhassan A Bukar

Nice

Ishwar Maradi