Why Vine’s 6 Seconds Of Fame Are Up

On 24th January 2017, the short video app Vine, officially shut-down. While the company has closed, Vine is all set to make a comeback in the form of Twitter’s new short video feature. However, before we gear up to welcome the service back with open arms, it is interesting to know why it was killed off in the first place.

The app which was popular for its six-second videos and not much else created many internet stars with short-lived fame. Here’s why Vine is no more:

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  1. Twitter is running with low funds

While Twitter is certainly not bankrupt, the company has been barely making a profit. With their stock at an all-time low, Twitter was recently forced to let go of around 350 employees. In an effort to shed some weight, the company decided to shut-down Vine which was not earning any money.

  1. Vine couldn’t compete with Instagram

The Vine restriction on videos to only six-seconds long, meant that it lost a large part of its appeal once Instagram launched its 15-second video feature. Thus eventually, Vine became redundant as more and more users began to shift to using Instagram to post their content.

  1. Vine stars quit on the site

A massive part of why Vine was so popular, were its ‘Vine Stars’. These well-known accounts were followed all over the world and thus gained internet-success very quickly. Unfortunately, once they had attained stardom, they decided to move on to social media platforms that were far more profitable. With platforms like YouTube, Facebook and Instagram to choose from, it was no surprise that Vine’s stars jumped ship. This also meant a reduction in the advertising that was done through these ‘Vine Stars’.

  1. The scope for advertising was limited

With only six seconds of video time to work with, advertisers did not find Vine as a viable platform for making money. Though users certainly enjoyed the ad-free experience, this added up to a loss in the app’s popularity. Yet again, advertisers were diverted to other social media platforms and they took more users with them.

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  1. The app didn’t build the traction it needed to

Unlike Facebook and Instagram which is frequented by users of all age-groups, Vine’s user demographic was restricted to those from 15 to 30 years. While at one point it held a position among the top five apps for entertainment, the app was unable to sustain itself through its features alone and it fell far behind on the leader board.

While Vine has not deleted any of the videos uploaded so far, the app has been shut down for good. For all those who miss the quirky and fun Vine videos, Instagram is sure to subdue that craving soon enough!

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Picture courtesy – wsj.net, ytimg.com


by techtalks @TechTalks February 2, 2017 11:54 AM UTC

DIGITAL DEBATE

Mobile Upgrades: Killing The Product Before Its Time?

Have to agree. The speed of newer phone models within the same series and newer app versions lead to more thought put into buying decisions. Phone lines have a definite short shelf life

Lionel Gurjao

Frequently upgrading the software is a real problem as updating the software might cause your phone to lag because of the older hardware.

Shivendra Singh

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

Q5 blackberry

Alhassan A Bukar

Nice

Ishwar Maradi