Windows 10: How To Protect Your Privacy

We are all aware how Gmail goes through your emails to display ads through DoubleClick or Google’s other advertising platforms. It turns out Microsoft, which introduced Windows 10 as a free service, follows the same strategy.

How does it use your information? Just as Google does- to develop its software and services and to provide you appropriate ads. But Microsoft also asserts that it does not use your data but does share your personal information to provide any service you requested or to complete your transaction.

To use a Windows 10 PC without a Microsoft ID, you can use what the operating system calls a ‘local account’. You can make that alteration in the Settings app’s Accounts page.

If you have not yet installed Windows 10 yet and you have a privacy concern, do not choose express settings during installation; if you opt for this, you will get gritty privacy options. You can also go to your Microsoft account’s privacy settings page at account.microsoft.com, where you can configure options for personalization, apps, marketing, and search privacy

The other thing you can do to stop from it giving away any personal information to Microsoft is to deactivate Cortana, the personal voice-responsive digital assistant. When you set up Windows 10, you will be prompted whether you want to use Cortana or not, and you can turn her off at any time. Go to Cortana’s panel, click the Settings gear, and switch her off.

Other way to protect yourself is when you upgrade or install Windows 10 on a computer that has several accounts, just re-add any child accounts to your family account, as clarified on Microsoft’s Set up family features on Windows 10 page. You can add a child’s email address on your family page. You can block unsuitable websites and apps.

Also you can go to the Settings app’s Privacy page, and it shall feature 13 tabs of privacy settings, including those overseeing use of your location, camera, microphone, speech, messaging, radios, inking, typing, account info, contacts, calendar, devices, feedback, diagnostics, and background apps. Some of the key ones appear on the General page, from which you can stop Microsoft from gathering browsing and other data.

Click off for all of these tabs let you turn off apps’ access. The Feedback and diagnostics tab does let you check usage info sent to Microsoft; if you want to avoid that, choose Basic.

As you can see, you can safe guard yourself pretty well, but doing so takes away a lot of the operating system’s charm. If you really want total privacy, the best option for you is not to connect to the Internet or depend on any kind of technology.

Picture courtesy- santanaelvis.com


by techtalks @TechTalks October 5, 2015 12:47 PM UTC

DIGITAL DEBATE

Mobile Upgrades: Killing The Product Before Its Time?

Have to agree. The speed of newer phone models within the same series and newer app versions lead to more thought put into buying decisions. Phone lines have a definite short shelf life

Lionel Gurjao

Frequently upgrading the software is a real problem as updating the software might cause your phone to lag because of the older hardware.

Shivendra Singh

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

They should come out with upgrades for the specific phones and not for the separate Operating System. This way a special version for your phones specific hardware can be made

Maalin Ashar

Q5 blackberry

Alhassan A Bukar

Nice

Ishwar Maradi